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P52.2 | Week 37 Classic Portraiture

As we continue to explore classic portraiture, this week we are delving into composition for full body portraits. Like the half-body and three-quarter portraits we explored last week, full body composition offers clues and context about the subject being portrayed. In many instances, the photographer will stand a considerable distance from the subject, getting a wide shot that reveals rich and detailed information about the subject’s life and personality. This kind of shot is excellent for storytelling, although the photographer must take care to ensure the subject is well-composed within the frame so they do not get lost in a busy background or otherwise compete for the viewer’s attention. In other cases, a photographer may direct their subject to get into a variety of body positions (sitting, kneeling, or lying down) in order to achieve an intimate portrait while still offering a narrative glimpse into the subject’s life.

Our year-long collaborative blog project is dedicated to composition and artistry. Please click HERE to read more about our project. The gallery mosaic is randomly sorted every time you load the page so please Refresh the page in your browser to see a different view. Please click on the individual images to see a larger version on the artist’s website and, in some cases, a series of related images.

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P52.2 | Week 36 Classic Portraiture

Colossians 1: 9-11  And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God.

As my children get older, I honestly believe I spend more time in prayer for them.  We recently celebrated our youngest daughter’s 16th birthday.  As her dad and I handed over a set of keys to her new car. (well, I should say…new to her! It is a used vehicle) brings me to the realization that my ability to protect her is lessening each and every day.

I’ve taken a break from all photography related projects recently, but am looking forward to getting back into the swing of things with “Who We Become“.  Our year-long collaborative blog project is dedicated to composition and artistry. Please click HERE to read more about our project. The gallery mosaic is randomly sorted every time you load the page so please Refresh the page in your browser to see a different view. Please click on the individual images to see a larger version on the artist’s website and, in some cases, a series of related images.

This week we explore the three-quarter profile portrait. This is the common pose of classic artists – think of Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa or the portraits of Botticelli and other artists of the Renaissance. The three-quarter pose can tells us more than a headshot: it reveals the story and character of the subject through his or her clothing, status and surroundings.

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Justin 2014 | Whitehouse, TX Senior Photographer

I was psyched to finally get to do a GUY senior session and with a special family friend to boot.  Meet Justin…He is a Senior at Whitehouse High School.  I’ve known this guy since birth and he is pretty special because he is a great guy.  He is kind, tender-hearted, and such a hard worker and is going to make some young lady a nice catch someday.  :) He is also special to our family because he has been a good friend and source of encouragement to my children.  Our families have spent a lot of time together.  I am very proud of him as I’ve watched him grow from a happy, smiley faced baby to a shy teenager and he has now matured into a responsible young man.  He leads by his good example, is a leader in the youth group, and the first to say a positive, encouraging word to others.  I wish you the best as you pursue your nursing degree at TJC and beyond.

Here are a few of my personal favorites from our session that was completed in March in downtown Tyler.  We shared lots of laughs with his mom and sister who accompanied us on the session and we completed the session with our favorite Mexican food meal!

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P52.2 | Week 15 Puppy Love

Love is a four legged word

Meet Sammy, our new miniature schnauzer puppy.  We are smitten with his sweet personality and he is the best cuddle partner while watching a movie.  I’m sure you will be seeing more of this little guy on the blog.  We are continuing our focus on Perspective, with the first month examining the way a choice of lens alters one’s viewpoint. This week we are seeking to isolate our subject, whether through the use of a telephoto lens or otherwise.

Telephoto lenses bring distant subjects close by magnifying the scene and, consequently, we are able to view only a smaller portion of it at a time. Moreover, telephoto lenses tend to create a shallow depth of field and compress the background, leaving less environment surrounding a subject, and that environment is often quite blurred. For this reason, portrait artists often use longer focal lengths, so that their subject remains prominent in the frame and other elements are reduced. The consequence, of course, is that the photographer then has fewer elements with which to tell her story.  Be sure and visit the collaborative site “Who We Become” to see everyone’s images in one place.

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P52.2 | Week 14

It is a new year, a new month, and a new topic on Who We Become. For the first two months we will be spotlighting Perspective, with four weeks examining the way your choice of lens can alter your viewpoint, and the second four focusing more on the camera and photographer.

Most everything in photography is a compromise, choices in which each of the options carries specific consequences. Our perspective results from how we make those choices – not simply the story we tell, but how we decide to tell it. Wide angle lenses allow our camera to see wider than the eye can, and therefore allow us to include a great deal of environment along with our subject. As such, they are typically the lens of choice for a landscape photographer. Wide angle lenses tend to flatten our subject into the environment, however, so that most everything seems about the same distance away. And just like flattening the globe into a 2 dimensional map, a great deal of distortion can result, particularly toward the edges of the frame. A savvy photographer can turn these supposed consequences into advantages – the choices allow us to develop our unique perspective.

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